How To

Woman uses tick stick to demostrate old carpentry hack for copying patterns

August 31st, 2021

Leah, the co-founder and master craftswoman of See Jane Drill, gives us a step-by-step tutorial on how to use a very special tool that has stood the test of time.

In a video that has been viewed over 4.4 million times, Leah introduces the ‘Tick Stick’ or ‘Ticking Stick.’

It’s a tool carpenters used hundreds of years ago and one that’s still useful today.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

In her tutorial, Leah shows us how to use this simple and ingenious tool.

She mentions that the Ticking Stick used to be a favorite among boatbuilders when they needed to quickly reproduce complicated, odd shapes.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

“Maybe you’re wondering why would I have to do that Leah…well let me tell ya, there is always a piece of tile, carpeting, roofing…it could be anything that’s an odd shape that’s very difficult to map out with a ruler or tape measurer so what I will tell you is this…all you need is a tick stick, a pencil, and piece of paper.” – Leah of See Jane Drill

Leah starts her tutorial by showing off an odd shape that has been cut out of wood.

She is going to replicate the shape using only her Ticking Stick, a pencil, and cardboard.

She mentions that the one requirement for making your own Ticking Stick is to have one sharp end. It also helps to add a notch in the middle.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

“The more unique you make the shape, the easier it will be for you to use.” – Leah

To start, you want to use a heavier piece of paper or cardboard. Lay it next to your shape so it fits inside but it is not covering any of the points.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

Time to use the ticking stick.

Leah advises that you need to secure the piece of paper or cardboard with either tape or tacks. This keeps it in place so it won’t move on you when you go to use the Ticking Stick.

Take the pointed edge of the Ticking Stick and push it all the way to the corner of one of the points in your shape.

Carefully trace the shape of your Ticking Stick on your paper or cardboard. Repeat this with each point in your shape.

You should be left with lots of markings on your cardboard or paper.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

Leah places the marked-up cardboard on top of another, larger piece of scrap cardboard.

Make sure when you lay your Ticking Stick over the outline that the point of the stick is still on the new piece of cardboard. Be sure to secure your piece of cardboard so it doesn’t shift on you.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

“Then we take our Ticking Stick and we start laying out our points.” – Leah

Leah places the Ticking Stick over each traced shape one at a time. She makes a dot where the point of the Ticking Stick lands on the cardboard.

She repeats this step for all the traced shapes of the stick until all points are dotted.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

“That’s where those notches come in handy…it makes it really easy for me to line everything up right on the money.” – Leah

After the dots have been mapped, Leah uses the edge of her Ticking Stick to join them together.

A shape emerges. She uses a knife to cut along the lines until the shape is cut.

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

“Now it’s the moment of truth…there you go folks..This is how you use a Ticking Stick.”

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YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill Source: YouTube screenshot - See Jane Drill

Watch the full video to see how this amazing tool really works below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: See Jane Drill, seejanedrill.com

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