Crafts & DIY
Uses For Cinnamon In The Garden
I never knew that cinnamon could be a gardener's best friend!
Ashley Brewer
08.10.17

Most people think of baking or aromatics when they think of the common spice cinnamon — and you wouldn’t be wrong. It’s a wonderful and ancient spice that has been traded and used for centuries, and it smells great!

Cinnamon is a fantastic and versatile spice because it can be used in so many dishes across so many cultures. But that’s not the only reason why cinnamon is so versatile — it has many uses in the garden as well.

These 6 uses for cinnamon in the garden will have you wishing you were using them years ago.

Get ready to up your garden game with a simple spice that you probably already have in your kitchen cupboard.

1. Keep mosquitos away

Wikimedia
Source:
Wikimedia

Mosquitos and other insects don’t like the heavy smell of cinnamon. Sprinkle a bit of cinnamon around your garden and near your patio to deter the pesky biting insects. Even though it’s not a pleasant smell for them, it’s a lovely one for us.

2. Combat fungus

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Wikimedia

Fungi have a tough time growing in ground that is saturated in cinnamon; it will actually kill it. This technique, however, will only combat shallow and surface level fungus and mushroom problems. You’ll most likely need another solution for deeper issues.

3. Keep ants away

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Wikimedia

Cinnamon kills ants fairly quickly and actually causes them to suffocate when they inhale the potent spice. The intense smell of cinnamon makes it difficult for ants to detect other food sources, throwing them off. The best part? It’s non-toxic for your kids and pets.

4. Root fresh plant cuttings

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Wikimedia

If you’re cutting plants to try and reproduce and root them; help the chances of your plant regrowing by using cinnamon. Simply put a bit of cinnamon on the stem of the cutting, plant in soil, and you’re all set. It’s a great alternative to expensive replanting products.

5. Heal sick and wounded plants

Free stock photos
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Free stock photos

Sprinkle a little cinnamon on a wounded plant, whether from cutting, transplanting or other types of damage, to help speed up healing and prevent any further injury.

6. Protect seeds and seedlings from disease

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The Rusted Garden
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The Rusted Garden

Keeping seeds and seedlings somewhat dry is key to their survival; it’s important to keep moisture at bay as much as possible. This technique is called damping off, and cinnamon is a great tool. It protects seedlings and helps combat fungus and disease on the baby plant.

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By Ashley Brewer
hi@sbly.com
Ashley Brewer is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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