Crafts & DIY
Man shows how to add weather stripping to old doors to keep heat in and cold out
Not all weather stripping is created equal. Ethan does a great job of explaining the difference and what works best in different situations.
Elijah Chan
12.12.22

Winter is fast approaching.

And it’s the perfect time to weatherproof your homes.

By this time, you would’ve noticed if some of your windows or doors are leaking with cold air.

These draughts can be a burden to your heating system, especially at a time when people need to be cozy.

This is especially troublesome for some old doors without proper frames.

Weatherproofing can also help contain the heat during this winter season.

YouTube content creator The Honest Carpenter shared a door weatherproofing technique.

Grab a few simple tools:

  • a hacksaw or saw that can cut through thin metal
  • a utility knife or box cutter
  • a drill
  • a tape measurer
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter

In this project, Ethan, the man behind the channel, weighed the advantages and disadvantages of metal and foam weather strips.

All weather strips aren’t created equal.

YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter

This simple device can be installed around your doorframe and it will help keep the outside air out and the inside air contained.

Cold winter winds won’t be able to seep in through the gaps because the foam or rubber lining will stop it from doing so.

This is a better alternative.

Ethan said that this is a better alternative even if it entails a bit of work.

He shared that stick-on weather strips, or those being plastered with adhesive, can wear off from repeated contact with the door.

YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter

Once it tears off, it’s not going to be very effective in insulating your house.

He recommends a metal weather strip.

This device has a rubber or foam-lined beam of metal that you can screw snugly into your door frame.

First, take the necessary measurements.

Ethan prefers installing the top frame first.

Using your measuring tape, take note of the length of your door frame’s width.

YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter

Using the measurement, mark your weather strip accordingly.

Then, using your utility knife, cut off the rubber or foam strip as marked.

Then with your hacksaw, cut off the metal part of the strip.

Ethan recommends installing this strip first.

Doing so will allow the other two strips to anchor on something.

With your door closed, press the foam part against it. It doesn’t need to be pressed hard, but it should be snug enough to close the gap.

YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter

Screw the weather strip in place.

You can do this using the screw slots on the strip.

You can adjust your placement accordingly by loosening the screw and moving the weather strip to your liking.

YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - The Honest Carpenter

When securing the strip in place, Ethan shared a very important tip.

Drill the screws in order.

Do this starting from one end to the other. Or, as he explained in the video, secure the top screw first, then the middle, then the lowest.

Repeat the process on the remaining sides of the door.

Weatherstripping is not only a good way to insulate, but it can also help in keeping some pesky pests, like insects, out.

He also explained in the caption that newer doors use a different kind of weather strip that’s easier to install.

So before doing this project, make sure you check what the right material is for you.

See how Ethan works his weather-stripping magic on an old door in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By Elijah Chan
[email protected]
Elijah Chan is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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