How To

How to make wildflower “seed bombs” to beautify neglected landscapes

June 18th, 2021

Our urban spaces could use some green in it.

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Pexels|Jean depocas Source: Pexels|Jean depocas

The concrete jungle we turned our cities into during the height of industrialization may be well-lauded. But let’s admit it: it does have suffocating air, and we need to get some green in it to have some fresh air.

This is where guerilla gardening is beneficial.

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Flickr|mathiasbaert Source: Flickr|mathiasbaert

Guerilla gardening is a collective action wherein people sow seeds in different neglected spaces, especially in the city. It can be plant boxes, sidewalk or center aisle soils, public parks, and more. As long as they are in a public place, one can (legally) plant on it.

People can do so with the use of seed bombs.

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Flickr|sebastiankauer Source: Flickr|sebastiankauer

These are little balls of seeds rolled into a ball and clay, compost, and sometimes fertilizer. It’s like a ready-made, ready-to-plant, all-in-one kit. All you have to do is plant it on barren soil or land that could use some vegetation.

Creating a seed bomb is easier than you think.

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Pixabay|congerdesign Source: Pixabay|congerdesign

You only need three important ingredients for your seed bomb: clay powder, compost, and seeds with a ratio of 3:5:1. You can buy the clay powder from your local craft or garden soil.

Place them in a small bowl and gradually add water.

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Flickr|Pairs on Ponce & Le Maison Source: Flickr|Pairs on Ponce & Le Maison

Make sure that it is not too sticky or gooey, yet not too runny. Let it reach a consistency where you can easily create truffle-sized balls out of them.

Mold them into circles around your palms.

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Flickr|urbanfoodie33 Source: Flickr|urbanfoodie33

Then, sundry them for at least an hour. You can place them by a sunny windowsill or outside. You can also use non-toxic modeling clay.

Get a clay out of the entire block around the size of a golf ball. Flatten it out like you would when you make a pastry that needs filling. In this case, your filling will be compost and seeds.

Place the compost and seeds in the middle of the clay.

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Flickr|urbanfoodie33 Source: Flickr|urbanfoodie33

Roll it up to mix them. You can sprinkle a bit of water if it is too dry, but remember not to make it too sloppy, either. You can add more soil to get rid of the sticky consistency of the clay.

Both ways work best for guerilla gardening.

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Wikimedia Commons Source: Wikimedia Commons

Just remember to check what kinds of flowers grow in your area to ensure that they thrive wherever you plant them. You can also mix seeds together, granting that they can grow alongside each other.

And one important reminder:

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Flickr/Tejvan Pettinger Source: Flickr/Tejvan Pettinger

Guerilla gardening should mean responsible gardening.

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Flickr|mathiasbaert Source: Flickr|mathiasbaert

Though the cause means well, it doesn’t mean it’s without its limitations. Always check the land you are planning to plant the seed bomb on. The most important thing is that it is a private lot or ground.

Also, check if the ground if it has other plants or trees present. If it does, double-check if these are plants that grow well with your flower seeds.

Learn more about seed bombs and how to make them from the experts at Hallmark in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Guerilla Gardening, Garden Culture Magazine, Instructables.com, The Ecologist/Hallmark Channel

Featured image credit: urbanfoodie33/Tejvan Pettinger

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