Crafts & DIY
11 Retailers Where You Can Haggle For A Lower Price
Never set foot in a retail store again without knowing these tips.
D.G. Sciortino
10.08.18

Haggling for a better price is customary in some places around the world. But in America, we usually only reserve the art of haggling for car dealerships and when making other large purchases.

We don’t think to start haggling during our trip to the mall.

So it would probably surprise you to learn that you can actually haggle at many popular U.S. retailers. First, you’ll need to master the art of haggling which you can do here. Next, you’ll need to learn where you can haggle.

Automotive News
Source:
Automotive News

Here Are 11 Retailers Where You Can Haggle For A Lower Price:

1) Department Stores

Believe it or not, you can get away with haggling in Nordstrom’s, Macy’s, Kohl’s, and Dillard’s. Just ask for a manager sometimes they will give you the sale price on an item that was recently on sale. You can also come back to the store after you’ve purchased something that’s now on sale and ask for the difference as a refund. Department stores are also allowed to give you 10 percent less than a competitor’s prices. Just pull up the lower price on your cell phone and show a manager. Sometimes you can just ask for discounts or extras to be thrown in, especially if you’re buying high priced items.

Flickr/Mike Kalasnik
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Flickr/Mike Kalasnik

2) Best Buy

You can haggle with floor managers at some Best Buys. They have sales goals that they have to hit, so it’s best to go there between the 29th and the 31st. You get the best discounts on higher priced items, you can also ask for freebies. You can also have luck haggling with floor models and open boxed items or items with damaged packaged on new items. You can get between 25 to 10 percent off.

Flickr/Mike Mozart
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Flickr/Mike Mozart

3 and 4) Home Depot and Lowes

Home Depot and Lowes have similar policies when it comes to haggling. High priced items, like appliances, that have some scratches, dents, dings, or torn packages are game for negotiating. You can also haggle on low quality lumber, roll-ends for carpet and linoleum and other items, and offcuts. Also ask for 10 to 15 percent off on floor models. You can also have luck with incorrectly stocked or priced items if it says $10 but its really $20 you may be in luck.

Flickr/Clotee Pridgen Allochuku
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Flickr/Clotee Pridgen Allochuku

5 and 6) Sam’s Club and Costco

These two stores also have similar negotiating policies. Ask a manager about discounts in aisles five, six, and seven where the biggest price cuts can be found. You may also get lucky with items that have of a sell-by date on the day you’re shopping, especially if it’s the end of the day.

Flickr/Mike Mozart
Source:
Flickr/Mike Mozart

7) Furniture Stores

You can haggle at local furniture stores as well as big chain stores. You can ask for 20 percent off items that are already in the clearance section. Look for any poor craftsmanship, scratches, etc. and ask for a discount. You also get more of a discount if you’re buying more.

Flickr/Lezan
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Flickr/Lezan

8 and 9) Target and Walmart

You can get up to 75 percent off on food that has reached its best-before-date or anything with beat up packaging or that looks questionable. You’ll also want to look for discounted items. Target will give you 13 percent off on damaged items.

Flickr/Mike
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Flickr/Mike

10) Pawn Shops

Check out pawn store discount codes before you head to the pawn shop. You can learn about these here. Always know as much as you can about items that you’re selling so you can get the best price and make the first offer knowing it will be countered by a much lower offer. Just know that when they say final offer it means final offer.

Flickr/tikitonite
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Flickr/tikitonite

11) Thrift Stores

Flickr/michelleanne0877
Source:
Flickr/michelleanne0877

You can haggle on items with sale tag since thrift stores have high turnover and want to move product. You can get extra discounts for items that are scratched, dented, and chipped. You’ll also want to ask for discounts on bulk purchases.

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By D.G. Sciortino
hi@sbly.com
D.G. is a contributing writer in Shareably. She's based in Connecticut and can be reached at hi@shareably.net.
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