How To

Woman shares technique to free people from having to crochet those pesky chains

May 26th, 2021

If you don’t crochet, maybe you’ll rethink it.

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Pexels|Castorly Stock Source: Pexels|Castorly Stock

Crocheting is a needlework technique that uses a crochet hook and a spool of fiber such as a yarn or crochet thread to create a garment project such as a bonnet, blanket, sweater, and the like. This technique uses the interlocking or looping of threads until the entire project is formed.

It’s one of the most therapeutic crafts, too!

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Pexels|Diego Pontes Source: Pexels|Diego Pontes

More than just doing crafts, crocheting helps with your mental health. It eases your anxieties, relieves depression, builds self-esteem, and accompanies you in times of grief, loneliness, and even insomnia. The American Counseling Association even includes crochet therapy as part of their Creating Interventions and Activities.

Today, you’re going to learn about Foundation Single Crochet (FSC).

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

This method allows you to begin your crocheting project with your foundation and first row at the same time. This is useful when you are not too sure how big your project will be or if you are working on a project that needs a long foundation row.

While most traditional crafters prefer the regular chain stitch, the FSC can be an advantage.

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Pexels|Asya Vlasova Source: Pexels|Asya Vlasova

Aside from forming both foundation and first row to make it easier to start a project, the FSC allows more stretching in your project. This is best when you are making something like a sweater or bonnet. Using the normal chain stitch makes a tighter outcome.

So, how can you make a Foundation Single Crochet?

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Pexels|Anete Lusina Source: Pexels|Anete Lusina

We’ll give you a quick guide on how to do it. So, grab your preferred yarn and a hook that would work with it, and let’s get started.

First, start with a slip stitch as you normally would and chain two.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

From the second chain, go through your hook, yarn over, and pull through chain one.

Next, yarn over and pull through the first one.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

Then, yarn over and pull through both chains. That’s how you finish your first single crochet.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

Now, from this point onwards, you’re going to see a ‘V’-shaped gap in between two loops from where you created the single crochet. This is where you start working from here on.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

Go in between those loops.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

Yarn over and pull through to create a chain.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

Again, yarn over and pull through that single chain you just created.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

Then, yarn over and pull through both chains.

Repeat this process until you get to your desired length.

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YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly Source: YouTube Screenshot|Tamara Kelly - Moogly

That’s it! You now know how to make a Foundation Single Crochet!

The FSC takes a lot of getting used to, especially if you’re used to starting your project with the usual chain stitch. However, this can prove helpful, especially in keeping count on how many stitches you have done so far.

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Pexels|Castorly Stock Source: Pexels|Castorly Stock

Haven’t gotten your groove yet?

Watch the full video tutorial and play it on repeat. Sooner or later, you’ll become a pro at this!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: YouTube, New Stitch A Day, Stitching Together, American Counseling Association, The Spruce Crafts

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