Crafts & DIY
Man shows what happens when superglue is mixed with baking soda
All of these uses are helpful but I'm a bit amazed at how he used it for the gear repair.
Valerie Ablang
11.10.22

What will happen if you mix superglue with baking soda?

Inventor 101 discovers the effect of adding baking soda to a single drop of super glue.

Before learning the experiment’s outcome, knowing the material to use is a good idea.

Super glue is an adhesive.

The superglue was discovered due to war efforts and was offered to the public in 1958

It was then used to stick various materials on different surfaces.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

Superglue is strong, but it’s temporary.

However, the bond can easily break with the glue alone if enough force is applied, which is why it is also known as temporary glue.

Baking soda changes all of that. A combination of super glue and baking soda creates a nearly indestructible bond.

The formed solid on the metal sheet in the video did not break or become deformed after it was pounded with a metal wrench.

A screw was glued on top of a bottle cap using super glue and baking soda to test out its effect.

The surface was prepared by sanding it down to make it a little rougher in texture.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

Adherence of the screw to the bottle cap became more secure and could no longer be removed with mere strength.

The addition of baking soda made the superglue stronger.

The screwed bottle cap was attached to a firmly secured attachment on top of a table.

Then, a 28-pound load was hung onto it using a rope.

It actually held up with ease.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

It can be seen that the product was able to easily withstand the weight.

The screw was hammered again.

The screw was pounded with a hammer but it was still attached despite the strength applied.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

He repaired a broken gear, too.

The resulting paste from the superglue/baking soda mixture was tested out by repairing a broken plastic gear.

Glue sticks and plastic tubing were used to create a mold.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

Part of the tube was cut and shaped into a semi-circle.

This was used to hold the glue stick while taking the shape details of the gear’s teeth.

Once cooled and solid, the molding was fitted around the gear.

It was a perfect fit.

The broken teeth of the gear were recreated using the mixture.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

Super glue was added to the cavities of the glue stick mold.

Then, a little bit of baking soda was sprinkled after.

These steps were repeated again and allowed to settle for a short period.

The molding was removed, and the cogs returned to their original shape again.

It also mended loose cabinet hinges.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

Some hinges loosen their attachment over time because of the type of wood used.

Super glue and baking soda were placed in the hole and allowed to solidify after some time.

After it hardened, the spot was chiseled and marked before drilling a hole.

It worked like a charm.

YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inventor 101

The hinge was screwed back and securely attached to the wood again.

Many people were impressed with the outcome of the hack. The video already has 18 million views. It was only uploaded three weeks ago.

One of the people who commented said,

“I’ve seen this trick before but your examples are the first that gave me so much inspiration. I can go fix a couple of things now.”

Others were even inspired to use this trick for repairing other things within their home.

See what just a tiny drop of superglue mixed with baking soda can do in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Article Sources:
To learn more read our Editorial Standards.
By Valerie Ablang
hi@sbly.com
Valerie Ablang is a contributor at SBLY Media.
Advertisement
Advertisement