Crafts & DIY
Mom earns 15 million views showing what happens to a raw egg when you cover it in vinegar for 24 hrs
If you have a kid at home you may want to try this with them.
Jaclyn Abergas
11.14.22

Do you want your young children to learn more about how science works?

Learning about science isn’t always about focusing on textbooks or watching science documentaries. Science can be fun, too!

And science can be fun to learn using experiments.

But what kind of experiments? Isn’t that dangerous?

Not always. You just have to find the right experiment where your child will learn a lot in a safe environment. Raising da Vinci shared ten experiments that are fun and educational and will ignite your child’s curiosity.

Cloud in a Bottle

Learn air compression with this experiment. What you’ll need is an empty plastic water bottle. Make sure it’s closed before you twist the bottle from the bottom. What you’re doing is forcing the air molecules to go up the bottle toward the top. When you open the cap, pressure is released and the air molecules expand, forming a cloud.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Imploding Can

Learn how air pressure works with this experiment. For this experiment, adult supervision is definitely required because you’re going to handle hot soda cans. First, add water and ice to a large bowl. Then heat the empty cans on the stove. Don’t heat them up for too long, just hot enough that you can’t touch them. Use tongs to transfer the hot cans and submerge it top part first in the ice water. Watch the cans implode.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Bouncy Egg

Learn about membranes with this egg and vinegar experiment. Use a glass bottle or cup, white vinegar, and a raw egg. Place the egg in the bottle or cup and add enough vinegar to completely cover the egg. Leave it for 24 hours. When it’s done, remove the egg and the shell will be easy to wipe off with your hands but inside, it’s still completely raw.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Invisible Ink

Want to share a secret message without getting caught? You can do that with this experiment. This is a two-parter and your child will need an adult to help them. First, mix 1/3 cup of baking soda with 1/3 cup of water. You’ll use the cotton buds as your pen by dipping them in the baking soda mix and writing on your paper. To read the message, add grape juice to a bowl and dip your paintbrush in the juice. Wipe the brush across the paper to reveal the message.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

DIY Hovercraft

You will need a balloon, an old CD, a bottle cap, and a glue gun. Poke a hole in the middle of your bottle cap and glue it on the middle of the CD. Blow up your balloon, twist the end so the air doesn’t escape, and attach it to the bottle cap. The release of the air will cause the CD to move around your surface.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Bending Water

This is a fun experiment. You can get your child involved by asking them to rub a PVC pipe against your hair or your shirt. Turn on the faucet and bring the charged PVC pipe near the water that comes out and watch the water bend!

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Balloon Racers

This is a great experiment when you have more than one child who can already run without assistance. Take a long ribbon and insert it through a straw. Tie one end to a closed door knob or a post/beam and the other end to a chair. Blow up the balloon and tape it to the straw. Hold the end of the balloon until you’re ready to start the race. Once you’re ready to start, release the balloon and watch it race to the other end.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Exploring Gallium

This is a fun way to explore creation with play. Buy a tube of gallium and melt it in hot water. Pour out the contents into a glass jar and play around with it. It’s safe and non-toxic but be sure to supervise your children’s play with it because they may swallow it.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Exploding Bag

This is a fun experiment, especially if you want to pretend you’re watching fireworks. In a sandwich bag that closes, add vinegar and baking soda. Close it quickly and wait for the mix to explode. It’s not a very big explosion so it won’t create a mess but it’s still best to do this over the sink or outside.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
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YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Balloon Inflator

Your child can learn chemical reactions with this experiment. All you need is vinegar, baking soda, an empty bottle, and a balloon. Fill the balloon with around 2-3 tablespoons of baking soda. Fill your bottle with around 1/2 cup of white vinegar. Attach the balloon to the mouth of the bottle, careful not to let the baking soda drop into the vinegar just yet. When you’re ready, lift up the balloon so the baking drops into the vinegar. Watch as the chemical reaction of the vinegar and baking soda forces the balloon to inflate but not explode.

YouTube - Raising da Vinci
Source:
YouTube - Raising da Vinci

Are you ready to try these experiments? Which one will you try first?

The best part about these experiments is that, except for the gallium and balloon, most of the ingredients are common household items that are already found in your pantry and office.

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A post shared by Amanda (@raisingdavinci)

For more detailed instructions on how to perform the experiments, watch the video below.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By Jaclyn Abergas
hi@sbly.com
Jaclyn Abergas is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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