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Man lives in a 78-square-foot apartment in NYC, shows how he makes it work

August 31st, 2020

Everyone knows that New York City apartments are tiny. But this guy’s cramped space is something else.

Luke Clark Tyler had been living in a 96-square-foot apartment for two years. It hadn’t been easy, but he learned to cope. When it was time to move, unlike most people, he opted for even less space.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

He looked online and found something that he thought was amazing. A titchy 78-square-foot studio in the heart of Manhattan. Yes, the space was small, but so was the rent. So he put in an application and got approved.

Clark Tyler has gotten used to incredibly cramped living, even for New York City standards. He’s made it work with a few neat tricks.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

For instance, instead of using an ottoman, Clark Tyler just rests his feet against the wall. And the sofa that he sits on was created entirely by him. As well a being a sofa, it’s also a bed.

The bed is on hinges and folds down to cover the couch(but you have to remove the couch back cushions first.)

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

When it’s folded down, the bed almost takes up the entire width of the apartment.

Built under the sofa/bed folding contraption is some hidden storage space. Clark Tyler keeps his summer/winter clothes and tools in there.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

The cost of the materials for the sofa/bed invention was only around $170.

Clark Tyler also works from home. So next to the bed/sofa is a desk and a chair. Under the desk, he has a few draws for storage on one side and a small fridge on the other side.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

And next to the desk is a closet. The upper shelves of the interior of the closet are filled with Clark Tyler’s clothing. But on the door shelves are a range of different essentials, such as personal hygiene products.

Lower down in the closet is what passes for a kitchen area.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

This is basically a microwave and some utensils. But his office also takes up some of this space, with his printer resting on top of the microwave.

When Clark Tyler moved in, the closet didn’t have a door.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

But he realized that by adding one, he could gain some extra storage space without making the room any more cramped.

The apartment itself doesn’t have its own bathroom. Instead, Clark Tyler has to share a bathroom with the residents of three other apartments on his floor.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

Luckily, the bathroom is located right across from his apartment, meaning he doesn’t have to go far to get there. Clark Tyler also grew up in a home with one bathroom, so he doesn’t find sharing much of an inconvenience.

Obviously, Clark Tyler lives in his tiny apartment on his own. But sometimes, he has to share it with a visiting family member or two.

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

When that happens, the family members sleep on the bed, and he takes the couch cushions and sleeps on top of them on the floor.

The rent that Clark Tyler pays for this apartment is just $800 a month, which for the center of Manhattan is incredibly low.

A video of Clark Tyler’s extremely small apartment then appeared on YouTube, where it went viral.

To date, over 6.2 million people have watched the video. It also has more than 27,000 likes and 12,000 comments. People have been saying things like this:

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YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen Source: YouTube - Kirsten Dirksen

Clearly, very few people could live like Clark Tyler. But it’s the life that he’s picked out for himself. And if he wants to, he can always move.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Kirsten Dirksen, Fair Companies

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